Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

The Cup & Cake Café
Paseo San Isidro 172
(Plaza El Arenal)
Colonia Barrio del Espirito Santo
Metepec, Edo de Mex
Facebook:
The Cup and Cake Café

Through my travels up and down this beautiful country I have visit some nice cafés like Tierras del Café and cafés with a nice mission like La Procedencia. But there is nice cafés and there is nice coffee. The Cup & Cake Café is one of the latter.
Walking around central Metepec this café came as a surprised. After a shopping spree in the artisan quarters Miss Z and I was looking for a place to sit down and maybe have something to drink. Turning the corner and there is was – like an epiphany. Just off the merchant street, but I had never seen it before.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

La Procedencia
Tonalá #109
(Esquina Guanajuato)
Colonia Roma
Mexico City
Facebook: laprocedencia
Twitter: @laprocedencia

La Procedencia in Mexico City is a… I don’t know what to call it, I could call it a way of life, but it sounds too portentous. For the sake of this post I will call it a cafe. Although it is so much more.

procedencia

Photo: Dan Freed

Maybe you are satisfied to drop by for a good cup of coffee, serving selected organic beans roasted with care from renowned regions as Oaxaca and Chiapas your taste buds will water when stepping through the door. But once you are in the odds are you will stay for while.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

Sleepless in the air somewhere over north-east USA and reflecting over my last three weeks in Mexico.
Coming home always leave me with an empty feeling, like I am not really belong. I expect a couple of days with insomnia and a weeks depression when back in Sweden.

Beside of the never before heard of security strike on Copenhagen Airport flying out, forcing me to run through two airports to catch flights, this has been one of the less adventures trips. No was there any big adventures planned.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

This blog has not been forgotten, just unfortunate circumstances. With some extremely hectic last 6 month working and now the last 7 weeks with a slipped disc which effectively have kept me away from the keyboard I have spent more time out walking with the camera.
But now it is time for a proof of life. Looking back I see my last post was about Christmas in the north, so what is better than a post about the complete opposite – Midsummer celebration in the south of Sweden.

poledancing

photo: Dan Freed



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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

This year we went north for Christmas. To the town of Sundsvall in the middle of Sweden. With a population of 51 000, just shy of 100 000 in the whole municipal area I would describe it as a small town, but for Sweden it is a mid-size city. Although being a university city the population fluctuate considerable between semesters and school breaks.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

I don’t think there is much arguing that there is a lot of problems in the world.
We have wars, corruptions, a climate crisis, a monetary system that is failing all over the world, both USA and EU takes punch after punch waiting for the final knock.
It is clear we need changes and new thinking.
I am convinced I will see a lot of big changes in my lifetime, but the changes will not come from our generation. The shift to a more sustainable world will be brought on by our children.
In a world becoming smaller and the information flowing faster they will not just sit silent. Thanks to evolution every new generation are born more intelligent than the former I can promise you they will stand up and show their parents they can do what we couldn’t.

Never the less. We can’t sit back and let our children clean up our mess, we have to give them the best possible chances to succeed.
As adults we learned that people are different, but still we force our children to be the same, do the same, think the same. They must all fit in the same square hole even if they are triangles, hexagons or round.
We need an educational change, maybe even and educational revolution.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

A couple of kilometers outside the village of Teapa we find Grutas del Cocona.
A large cave system containing 8 large rooms connected with 500 meters, mostly walkable, underground path. A nice daytrip and an escape from the oppressive heat in Tabasco.
My visit at the caves was not only a cool day away from the sun it also became a small adventure. Usually the caves are lightened up, this day it was a power outage.

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On my day at the plantation I did not stand around watching the workers loading bananas all the time. We also had a look around the domains and the savanna surrounding the cultivated land – And we were traveling with style.
On the back of a mule I saw plenty of the amazing nature and exotic wildlife of Tabasco. I was offered a horse, but haven’t been riding for 25 years a stubborn donkey felt safer than a bolting stallion.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

Bananas has been a hot topic in Sweden the last couple of years after the documentaries Bananas!* a film about plantation workers in Nicaragua and the follow up Big Boys Gone Bananas!* telling the following story when a small documentary filmmaker was sued by a multi-billion dollar company.

Personally I haven’t eaten bananas in a few years as my own personal protest. This, of course, has been a basis of discussions and – I believe – a source for many jokes in Mexico. Especially here in Tabasco where platanos come with the mother’s milk.
When it got known I was going to Tabasco I was invited to visit a plantation to see with own eyes how they grow bananas around here.
My day at a plantation was long, hot and very interesting.

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Previously posted in www.planningmexico.com

Mexico is a country of opposites. I have spent the last summers in the middle of the country, in the city of Toluca, about 60 km (close to 40 miles) west of Mexico City. Going a few hours north it is dry land and all you see is brown, sunburned fields. Going a few hours south it is all green with an amazing vegetation.

Nowhere is the opposites of the country and the complexity of the Mexicans so clear as in the state of Tabasco.
Half of Mexico is geographically in the tropic, but Tabasco is the real tropic with rainforest , rivers and fertile soil. Step on a Papaya seed today and next year you have a blooming plant.
There is fruit growing in the wild everywhere, mango, papaya, cacao and all kind of citrus as orange, lime and lemon. Some fruits I have never seen before, like the colorful pitaya.

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